Eco Glamping & Camping | Natural Holidays & Packages

Eco Glamping & Camping | Natural Holidays & Packages

Eco Glamping & Camping Natural Holidays

 Have you seen this cool feature article in the Kerryman Newspaper about Glamping and Camping in Ireland?

It was fantastic to be featured in such good company! Glamping and Camping are both great ways to experience Nature up close and being comfortable exploring the outdoors.

Here is an excerpt:

Glorious glamping…have you tried it yet?

The great outdoors and luxury aren’t exactly a perfect match in most people’s minds but when it comes to sampling the delights of nature and scenic beauty, you’ve got to try this. Glamping is the newest trend to hit the outdoor activities market where you can have all the luxury you need while enjoying a night under the stars.

Glamping is basically the evolution of an old favourite (camping) and it certainly seems to be taking the tourism industry by storm with outdoor accommodation in the form of log cabins, microlodges, reworked Romany caravans and bell tents – many of which include quirky bedsits and furniture, Wi-Fi, and lovely porticos and decking areas. While the names, and style of accommodation is certainly novel – even bordering on the chicly absurd – the experience is an amazingly unique one.’

Here at Crann Og we offer the ‘old school’ pitch-your-own-tent camping but also more luxurious and cosy Glamping options. Choose between a Romantic Eco Cabin, a spacious Bell Tent and two newly built and tastefully fitted Yurts, our Cosy Yurt and Luxury Yurt. All of these are perfect for a couple’s romantic getaway, nature lovers, friends and families. Provided for your comfort are solar lights, solid fuel stoves and handcrafted outdoor furniture for alfresco dining right there at your door.

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We have created a beautiful paradise of 14 acres of natural gardens, trees, sculpted willow fedges, arches, domes and tunnels for you to discover. Facilities are hand crafted from reclaimed and recycled materials, avoiding use of potentially toxic building materials. There are additional areas for camping, retreating, playing and many friendly animals.

At Crann Og we limit the number of guests on-site at any one time to guarantee peace and tranquillity, and that all who come and stay have plenty of personal space to relax without feeling crowded or disturbed by others if peace and quiet is a priority for your stay with us.

The problem with Disposable Coffee Cups

The problem with Disposable Coffee Cups

Disposable Coffee Cup Recycling (infographic)

 

 Are you a coffee lover?  Do you take your coffee on the fly?  Have you ever considered what happens to all those disposable coffee cups?  It hadn’t really crossed our minds, ’til one day the guys over at Cater4You sent us an infographic on the subject…and well, we were shocked!

 

Do the world a favour and check out this infographic, you will be amazed at the impacts and issues created by all those coffees!  Did you know that coffee is now the second most popualr drink in the world, second only to water!  We need to get this issue sorted!  Hats off to all those suppliers offering an alternative to old school disposable coffee cups.  Please do your part and help alleviate this massive waste and recycling issue!  It should make you think twice next time you’re chasing a shot of liquid intelligence!

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Just what my body & soul needed

Just what my body & soul needed

Most nourishing natural retreat

Relax, Walk, Stretch & Enjoy – our ReNature Yoga Natural Retreat from 6th to 9th of April was a wonderful, relaxing experience. Quite a mixed and international group of people joined us for 4 days to unplug, relax and get away from the hustle and bustle of life.

This wonderful retreat was lead by Marion Edler-Burke and Flor Burke, owners and creators of Crann Og Eco Farm.

Participants attended from Ireland, UK and Germany…a lovely bunch!

Days were filled with yoga, nature therapy guided walks, mindfulness practices, good food, lots of laughter, singing and plenty of time to relax and do nothing, to just enjoy the beautiful nature surrounding us.  Not to mention lots of gorgeous vegetarian food prepared by Brigid O’Leary, Paul King and Merle Diekmann.

We also had a storytelling night around a warm campfire, were we shared many of our adventures and experiences with nature.

The retreat included tactile activities such as nature arts and crafts with gentle yoga classes, mindfulness walks and meditation and breathing practices to deepen our connection with nature as well as our inner self.

We were treated to a Sound Bath by Fiona McDonagh of Lamh Clinic on Saturday afternoon.

It was such a joy for us to see everyone drop down deep, slow down and relax.  They were all beaming smiles and bonded deeply.

Here’s what they said:

‘Fabulous retreat, really enjoyed the yoga and woodland walks.’

‘It was just what my body and soul needed.’

‘Thank you all so much for the most nourishing retreat for the soul.’

‘It has been a truly wonderful retreat, thank you for the delicious meals.’

During our retreats, each moment, each experience provides the opportunity to reconnect with nature, yourself and the essence of community.

If you would like to get unplugged & back to nature and experience such a restorative and deeply relaxing weekend yourself, we will host the next ReNature Yoga Retreat from 28th September to 1st of October 2017.

You can find out more and book your place here.

For the next retreat we will be offering yurts, a super big bell tent and our private eco cabin for private accommodation, couples and/or close friends to share…totally glamped out, luxury off grid eco accommodation…to really get back to nature!

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Build A Yurt Series:  Part 3 – Cord work

Build A Yurt Series: Part 3 – Cord work

Build a Yurt Part 3: cord work

 

 Welcome to Part 3 of a series of posts showing you how to build a Yurt.

The new yurts we are making will be available to stay at Crann Og Eco Farm during the spring, summer and autumn months as part of our ecotourism experience in the Irish wilderness.  In Part 1 & 2 we prepared the wall lattice slats and the roof poles. Part 3 is all about the actual building of the wall lattice structures.

We are using 4mm diameter hemp cord to tie together the lattice slats and make loops in the end of the roof poles.  The cord was precut into 17cm long pieces to give us sufficient working length for knotting and threading of the slats  The roof pole loops were precut at 25cm length. As hemp is a natural fibre it can not be melted to stop the ends fraying, which they will do immediately.

So we dipped the ends of all the precut cords into melted wax and then shaped them by fingers.  This stops the cord fraying and creates a needle like end for easier threading through the 5mm holes in the slats and poles.  The pieces for tying slats were dipped to 2.5cm in wax at both ends, the roof pole loops approximately 6cm at either end.  This is very time consuming work, but the time and effort put into dipping and shaping the precut cords makes the construction of the lattices so much easier.  This is a long process and tedius so anything one can do to make it easier is very, very wise!

Next step is to lay out a number of lattice slats and commence tying together by tying a knot in one of the 17cm long cords, threading through two overlapping slats and then knot on the opposite side.  This leaves quite a bit of excess cord, but it is neccessary in order to have enough cord for tying the second knot, especially if you have big fingers.  The excess is then trimmed off for tidiness.  The lattices consist of 3 sections of 11 overlapping pairs of slats for the 4.2m yurt, and 3 sections of 13 overlapping pairs for the 5.5m yurt.

The final step in the wall lattice construction is to correctly fashion the ends of the sections to make perfectly fitting joins of two sections, such that they come together in a way that makes the join difficult to see.  Trust me, the first one you make takes an age to get right and understand, but once you have it then it’s really quite simple.  Like everything else, you need to do it to really learn it, and it seems terribly difficult at first and quite frustrating.  But the end product is worth the mental gymnastics!

To finish off this post it’s then time to make the roof pole loops, which is simply the case of threading cord through the holes in the butt ends of the roof poles and tying them such that it is still possible to comfortably loop over the wall lattices without too much effort.  It’s handy to have an off-cut of the wall slats to slide into the loop cord as you tighten it up to get the correct length.

Coming up soon in Part 4 is the roof crown and door frame assembly!

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Build A Yurt Series:  Part 2 – Roof Structure

Build A Yurt Series: Part 2 – Roof Structure

Build a Yurt Part 2: roof structure

 

Welcome to Part 2 of the Build a Yurt series. This post is all about making the roof poles which will slot into the roof crown and rest upon the wall lattices. This section shows the jig for processing the poles, chamfering and tapering poles with a power planer and end sanding to protect the overlying canvas.

Our two yurts will be of two sizes, one 4.2m (14ft) and one 5.5m (18ft) diameter. For the 5.5m yurt the poles are 2.735m long and for the 4.2m yurt they are 2.08m.

 

The roof poles started out as 2’x2’s, which were planed down to fit neatly on top of the V-notch between wall slats and slot into the holes in the central roof crown. Paul modified the Jig used for processing the wall lattice slats, enabling the edges of the poles to be chamfered uniformly, making two passes with the planer set to maximum depth. Planed edges and finish detail were then all hand sanded.

At the butt of the roof poles where they join the wall lattices, two 5mm holes were drilled, 20mm and 40mm from the end of the pole, through one of the chamfered edges, terminating in the opposite edge. These are for the hemp cords that will loop over the wall lattices when the roof poles are positioned correctly, to stop them slipping away as the yurt is erected.

The butts were then tapered first by power planer making successive cuts at 1.5mm while rotating the pole, and then finished off on the upturned belt sander for shaping and rounding. The ends were then finished lovingly by Flor by hand, to ensure a round and smooth finish to protect the canvas roof.

The jig was again modified to allow uniform tapering of the pole tops where they will slot into the roof crown. Exact and uniform tapering is performed by making a series of planer cuts of 1.5mm at 100mm, then 200mm, then 300mm, 400mm and finally 500mm from the top end.

Each planer cut goes all the way through to the top of the pole, the successive cuts resulting in a tapered end. The planing is performed on four sides of the pole, the edges then planed off with a light cut until a roughly circular end is created.

Then it’s back to the sander to shape and smooth the top ends of the poles bit by bit, checking them for correct diameter in the crown holes, until they are a perfect snug fit. In the case of our larger roof poles the absolute ends were shaped by hand with a sharp knife to make them cylindrical, before final sanding, again finished by hand sanding.

Coming up soon in Part 3 is the construction of the wall lattices and making the funky lattice section joins.

 

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