Eco Glamping & Camping | Natural Holidays & Packages

Eco Glamping & Camping | Natural Holidays & Packages

Eco Glamping & Camping Natural Holidays

 Have you seen this cool feature article in the Kerryman Newspaper about Glamping and Camping in Ireland?

It was fantastic to be featured in such good company! Glamping and Camping are both great ways to experience Nature up close and being comfortable exploring the outdoors.

Here is an excerpt:

Glorious glamping…have you tried it yet?

The great outdoors and luxury aren’t exactly a perfect match in most people’s minds but when it comes to sampling the delights of nature and scenic beauty, you’ve got to try this. Glamping is the newest trend to hit the outdoor activities market where you can have all the luxury you need while enjoying a night under the stars.

Glamping is basically the evolution of an old favourite (camping) and it certainly seems to be taking the tourism industry by storm with outdoor accommodation in the form of log cabins, microlodges, reworked Romany caravans and bell tents – many of which include quirky bedsits and furniture, Wi-Fi, and lovely porticos and decking areas. While the names, and style of accommodation is certainly novel – even bordering on the chicly absurd – the experience is an amazingly unique one.’

Here at Crann Og we offer the ‘old school’ pitch-your-own-tent camping but also more luxurious and cosy Glamping options. Choose between a Romantic Eco Cabin, a spacious Bell Tent and two newly built and tastefully fitted Yurts, our Cosy Yurt and Luxury Yurt. All of these are perfect for a couple’s romantic getaway, nature lovers, friends and families. Provided for your comfort are solar lights, solid fuel stoves and handcrafted outdoor furniture for alfresco dining right there at your door.

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We have created a beautiful paradise of 14 acres of natural gardens, trees, sculpted willow fedges, arches, domes and tunnels for you to discover. Facilities are hand crafted from reclaimed and recycled materials, avoiding use of potentially toxic building materials. There are additional areas for camping, retreating, playing and many friendly animals.

At Crann Og we limit the number of guests on-site at any one time to guarantee peace and tranquillity, and that all who come and stay have plenty of personal space to relax without feeling crowded or disturbed by others if peace and quiet is a priority for your stay with us.

Build A Yurt Series:  Part 1 – Preparing wall lattices

Build A Yurt Series: Part 1 – Preparing wall lattices

Build a Yurt Part 1: wall lattices

 

 Welcome to Part 1 of a series of posts showing you how to build a Yurt. Traditionally of Mongolia, we will be building a variation though very similar.  We are building two yurts to replace our old ones that have been used by ecotourism guests over the last few years.

The new yurts will be available to stay at Crann Og Eco Farm during the spring, summer and autumn months.  In Part 1 we start with the making of wall lattice slats with locally sourced milled timber for speed and a finer quality interior finish.

We will be making 5ft (1.52m) tall wall lattices which require slats to be cut to 78” (1.98m) in length. Our two yurts will be of two sizes, one 14ft (4.2m) and one 18ft (5.5m) diameter. For the larger of the two yurts we need approximately 90 full size slats of 78”, and a few shorter ones. But we’ll come back to that later. For the smaller yurt we have cut the same number of slats as no doubt there will be some breakages during construction due to knots or splits in the timber.

Next step is to drill all the holes for tying the slats together to form the wall lattices. We will be using 4mm diameter hemp cord and have drilled our holes at 5mm diameter to make tying easier and allow some tolerance, so that slats can rotate around the cord when opened or compressed for storage concertina style, rather than twisting it.

Holes need to be drilled accurately and in the same position on each slat piece, otherwise your lattices will not work and will look terrible! This will compromise overall structural integrity of the yurt also. On each slat holes must be drilled 50mm from the top, 100mm from the bottom and at 300mm centres between these two holes. You guessed it, that’s a lot of holes! And yes, that could take a lot of time indeed.

So our resident pro Paul made a ‘Jig’ that enabled him to drill up to 9 slat pieces in one pass, three rows by three deep, clamped together to prevent movement and to straighten any bent timbers. This ensured that all the slat pieces have their holes in the same place and speeds up the process considerably. The time taken to make a good Jig is well worth the time and effort it saves overall.

Each of the hole spacings is marked on the jig and a vertical timber off-cut fixed to act as a vertical guide so that all the holes pass through the slats in the same position and angle. It’s also really important to be using nice sharp drill bit(s) so that you get nice clean holes. After each nine slats have all their holes drilled, de-clamp them from the jig and quickly sand paper the drill holes by hand to tidy them up.

 Next it’s time to shape the tops of the slats to better receive the roof poles and to smooth them so as not to damage the roof canvas when it is placed over the structure. Again Paul made a pattern for the end of the slats, marking each individually. Then the shaping was done, first using a quality jig-saw and then finished off with a belt sander. The sander was turned upside down and strongly fixed in position to prevent movement and ensure safe use. This allows fast hands-free sanding and allowed us to process all the wall slats in very little time.

Coming up soon in Part 2 is the making of the roof poles, including making the Jig, chamfering and tapering the poles with a power planer, and end sanding to protect the canvas.

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Leave No Trace in Nature

Leave No Trace in Nature

 

 Leave No Trace is an outdoor ethics programme designed to promote and inspire responsible outdoor recreation through education, research and partnerships.

At Crann Og Eco Farm we actively promote the seven codes to our guests to ensure the preservation of our ecofarm and the surrounding woodlands and wetland areas.

 

Here are the Crann Og Eco Farm Leave No Trace Codes of Conduct:

Plan Ahead and Prepare

Know the regulations and special concerns for the area. Visit in small groups. Repackage food to minimize waste. Travel & camp on durable surfaces. Concentrate use on existing trails and campsites.

Dispose of Waste Properly

Pack it in, pack it out. Pack out all trash & leftover food. Deposit solid human waste in catholes dug 6 to 8 inches deep, at least 200 feet from water, camp and trails. Pack out toilet paper and hygiene products.

Leave What You Find

Leave rocks, plants and other natural objects as you find them. Avoid introducing or transporting non-native species. Do not build structures, furniture, or dig trenches.

Minimize Campfire Impacts

Campfires can cause lasting impacts to the backcountry.

Use only designated fireplaces at Crann Og, do not light fires in the woods. Use only wood supplied by Crann Og, do not collect firewood from the forest.

Respect Wildlife

Observe wildlife from a distance. Never feed animals. Control pets at all times, or leave them at home. Avoid wildlife during sensitive times: mating, nesting, raising young, or winter.

Be Considerate of Other Visitors

Respect other visitors and protect the quality of their experience. Let nature’s sounds prevail. Avoid loud noises.

And why would we follow and support those principles?

Nature plays an important part in our daily lives and impacts us positively whether we are aware of it or not. Preserving the natural environment is one of our missions here as we are located next to protected woodlands and are advocates of reconnection to nature for education and health.

Following these principles is also a requirement for our Gold Certification with Ecotourism Ireland, the national ecotourism organization, ratified by the Global Sustainable Tourism Council.

Get more info about our Leave No Trace & Conservation Values.

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Nature Therapy Benefits – Feel Good Factor

Nature Therapy Benefits – Feel Good Factor

Back to Nature

 

 The Connacht Tribune has run a feature on Crann Og Eco Farm promoting the importance of Nature and the positive effects it has on our daily lives.

Connecting with nature through guided Nature Therapy Walks, Nature School and ReNature Retreats helps us slow down and relax, reduces stress, strengthens our immune system and lifts our mood.

We have been talking about nature therapy benefits since 2004. Visitors and participants emerge from Crann Og reconnected, restored and relaxed. Their shoulders drop, their smiles broaden and they sleep deeper.

 

 

It was fantastic to have such a lengthy feature written about Crann Og and Marion, helping to promote the cause of getting people back to nature for well being and health, emotional and physical. Many thanks to Judy Murphy of the Connacht Tribune for such a good article!

Marion will be giving an introduction to Nature Therapy Walks at the BurrenBeo Landscape Symposium on 10th – 12th March 2017.

Get more info about our ReNature Retreats here.

Follow this link for Nature Therapy Walks.

Read the online article here.

 

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Eco Conscious Camping: Irish Times Review Article

Eco Conscious Camping: Irish Times Review Article

Eco Farm Camp Site

A family friendly eco camp site in the west of Ireland, Crann Og Eco Farm featured in The Irish Times as one of the best eco-friendly camping spots in Ireland.

Spend your time exploring the Burren National Park, the Cliffs of Moher, The Wild Atlantic Way, Coole Park, Yeats Tower (Thoor Ballylee) and Kilmacduagh Monastery.

Or explore ancient woodlands, hang out on the eco farm, play with friendly animals and chill out, ReNature and Relax at this Gold certified, self catering Ecotourism venue. (see Ecotourism Ireland).

Click here to read the full article.

 

 

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